Egyptian Mantis
(
Miomantis paykullii)
Size:                 ♂   4 cm      ♀   4 cm

Food:                flying insects, crickets

Temperature:        Day: 80-90 F     Night: 65-75F

Humidity:        40-50%

Hatching rate:        50-100 nymphs

This is a small species natives from Middle East and North Africa countries. Hatchling of this
species is very small (4-5 mm) but is a ferocious eating machine, and with proper food supply they
can grow into adulthood in as early as just two months. However, cannibalism in this species is
very common and could be as early as L2. Female and male grown up to about the same length
but female has wider abdomen and shorter antenna. This species will mate as early as 3 days
into adult. Female produced many oothecae and always hungary for food.

I started this species in 2006 with oothecae from Germany, they hatched out under high temp
(90F) in just slightly over 3 weeks! Subsequent ootheca takes around 4 weeks to hatch under 80F.
Hatchling starts feeding on smaller fruit flies that seem to large to handle but they will attack and
consume it. They grow up rapidly when food and heat are both available. Humidity is not really an
issue but starving will definitely reduce your stock as they continuously seeking food and
cannibalism is very common when keep together after L3, especially food is absent for a long time.

This species breed and lay ootheca profusely, if you don’t control the ootheca laying hundreds of
nymphs will swarm your cage. I raised this species all together until subadult, and then separate
the male from female. Casualty is low among adult male but it is different with the cage exclusively
for female only. I introduced few males into the female cage and they immediately find female to
mate. However, all males were consumed in next day. So it is very important to separate male from
female before adult or end up with situation where male is scarce and were all eaten by female.   

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